Brookbank, Lyn Gordon: Service no. 769576

Digitized Service Record

Source: “Duty Nobly Done” page 287.

Won Distinguished Conduct Medal.

DCM Citation for Brookbank

The London Gazette Publication date: 14 January 1919 Supplement: 31128 Page: 849

During an attack this N.C.O. went forward under very heavy fire to an exposed position in front of Vis-en-Artois on the 28th August, 1918, where he remained for eight hours keeping up a continuous observation of the enemy’s movements. The information he sent back was of the utmost importance and largely contributed to the subsequent success of the operation. His example of gallant endurance and determination was very fine.

The London Gazette Publication date: 14 January 1919 Supplement: 31128 Page: 849

Biography from London Medal Company

Lyn Gordon Brookbank was born on 31st October 1885 in Streetsville, Ontario, Canada, and having worked as a prospector, and also seen service with the Canadian Militia for three years with the Queen’s Own Rifles of Toronto, and one year with the 36th Peel Battalion of Infantry, with the outbreak of the Great War then enlisted into the Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force as a Private (No.769576) with the 124th Battalion Canadian Infantry – the Governor General’s Bodyguard, at Toronto on 3rd January 1916.

Posted with the 124th Battalion to England in August 1916, the battalion was redesignated the 124th Pioneer Battalion on joining the Canadian Expeditionary Force, and Brookbank, who had been promoted to Sergeant, then found himself transferred to the 18th Western Ontario Battalion, Canadian Infantry, and unit of the 4th Infantry Brigade in the 2nd Canadian Division.

It was whilst in action during the Battle of Amiens in front of Vis-en-Artois on 28th August 1918 that Brookbank won his Distinguished Conduct Medal.

Brookbank’s award was published in the London Gazette on 16th January 1919, with the citation reading as follows:

‘During an attack this Non Commissioned Officer went forward under very heavy fire to an exposed position in front of Vis-en-Artois on the 28th August, 1918, where he remained for eight hours keeping up a continuous observation of the enemy’s movements. The information he sent back was of the utmost importance and largely contributed to the subsequent success of the operation. His example of gallant endurance and determination was very fine.’

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