Weatherill, Ernest Bertrand Peter: Service no. 123146

CVWM Page

Digitized Service Record not available date of post.

Source: September 1916 casualty.

Note that this soldier is unconfirmed. Some sources indicate he served with the 58th Battalion at the time of his death.

Bertrand Weatherill was born in Oil City, Lambton County, on November 8, 1895, the son of Robert Weatherill (born in Toronto) and Laura Louisa (nee Keating, born in Oil Springs) Weatherill, of Wyoming, Ontario. His siblings included Helen Eskelly (born 1888) and Robert James (born 1889). Bertrand’s father Robert was a merchant in Oil City before engaging in a brokerage business and still later in fruit farming. Father Robert died on his farm in 1899 from the effects of food poisoning. Mother Laura would remarry in December of 1907, to John Palmer Jarmaine.

Bertrand, a bachelor, left his job as a banker and enlisted on September 7, 1915 in London, Ontario. His enlistment papers also recorded that he had one year prior experience with the Queen’s Own Rifles, Toronto. Bertrand became a member of the Army, Canadian Infantry, Central Ontario Regiment, 58th Battalion, with the rank of Corporal. One year after enlisting, on September 17, 1916, Bertrand Weatherill would lose his life while fighting during the Battle of the Somme, France. Bertrand Weatherill would later be officially listed as, Previously reported Wounded and Missing now for Official purposes presumed to have died. Twenty-three year old Bertrand Weatherill has no known grave. He is memorialized on the Vimy Memorial, Pas de Calais, France and was awarded the Victory Medal and the British War Medal. Bertrand’s name is also included on a World War I memorial tablet in St. Paul’s Anglican Church, in Toronto, along with the names of 75 other men of that church who died during the Great War. On the Sarnia cenotaph, his name is inscribed as C. Weatherill.

Source: The City of Sarnia Rememberance Project

Newspaper Clipping. Source: CVWM

Newspaper Clipping. Source: CVWM

War Memorial – World War One memorial tablet, St. Paul's (Anglican), Bloor St. East, Toronto, Ontario. One of two memorial tablets set within a spectacular carved alabaster chancel screen. Erected in memory of the men of St. Paul's who died during the first World War and unveiled in March 1926. Each alabaster tablet incorporates mosaic work depicting kneeling angels holding a laurel wreath and a torch. Seventy-six names in total were listed by date of death. Inscribed: 'DYING AND BEHOLD WE LIVE', and 'So he passed over, and all the trumpets sounded for him on the other side.' (John Bunyan). Photo by Marika Pirie. Source: CVWM

War Memorial – World War One memorial tablet, St. Paul’s (Anglican), Bloor St. East, Toronto, Ontario. One of two memorial tablets set within a spectacular carved alabaster chancel screen. Erected in memory of the men of St. Paul’s who died during the first World War and unveiled in March 1926. Each alabaster tablet incorporates mosaic work depicting kneeling angels holding a laurel wreath and a torch. Seventy-six names in total were listed by date of death. Inscribed: ‘DYING AND BEHOLD WE LIVE’, and ‘So he passed over, and all the trumpets sounded for him on the other side.’ (John Bunyan). Photo by Marika Pirie. Source: CVWM

 

Inscription – World War One memorial tablet set in the chancel screen at St. Paul's (Anglican), Toronto, Ontario. The screen is in three sections, with the two outside sections displaying the tablets. The chancel screen includes statues of twelve historic figures including Admiral Earl Beatty, King George V, Earl Kitchener, Marshal Foch, Earl Haig, and Lord Byng of Vimy. The screen was the work of Messrs. J. Wippell & Co., of Exeter, England. The great chancel war memorial windows are located above. These are inscribed: 'To the Greater Glory of God and in Everlasting Remembrance of the Men of St. Paul's Parish who gave their lives in Defence of Justice, Liberty and Truth, A.D. 1914-1919.' They were unveiled in 1921 by the Governor-General of Canada, Baron Byng of Vimy. Another World War One memorial window in honour of the men named on the tablets is located on the east wall of the Nave. The panels include fragments of glass from 70 buildings in the war zones. It was unveiled by Baron Byng of Vimy in 1922. Both windows were manufactured by Robert McCausland Ltd. of Toronto. Photo by Marika Pirie. Source: CVWM

Inscription – World War One memorial tablet set in the chancel screen at St. Paul’s (Anglican), Toronto, Ontario. The screen is in three sections, with the two outside sections displaying the tablets. The chancel screen includes statues of twelve historic figures including Admiral Earl Beatty, King George V, Earl Kitchener, Marshal Foch, Earl Haig, and Lord Byng of Vimy. The screen was the work of Messrs. J. Wippell & Co., of Exeter, England. The great chancel war memorial windows are located above. These are inscribed: ‘To the Greater Glory of God and in Everlasting Remembrance of the Men of St. Paul’s Parish who gave their lives in Defence of Justice, Liberty and Truth, A.D. 1914-1919.’ They were unveiled in 1921 by the Governor-General of Canada, Baron Byng of Vimy. Another World War One memorial window in honour of the men named on the tablets is located on the east wall of the Nave. The panels include fragments of glass from 70 buildings in the war zones. It was unveiled by Baron Byng of Vimy in 1922. Both windows were manufactured by Robert McCausland Ltd. of Toronto. Photo by Marika Pirie. Source: CVWM

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