Cash, Henry Wells: Service no. 53089

Brother to Lieutenant Wilfrid Arthur Cash.

“Two days prior to Armistice day Henry was gassed and was taken to hospital where while being treated he developed influenza and pneumonia which caused his death.” Note no mention of gas attack.

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“Died” (Pneumonia) at no. 44 Casualty Clearing Station.

 

CVWM Page

Brother killed in action 18th Battalion.

Details from Nottinghamshire County Council

Digitized Service Record

Person Details

Place of birth:  North Scarle, Lincolnshire
Family History

Employment/Hobbies

He worked at the Nottingham Co-Operative Society
Date of death:  03 Dec 1918
Age at death:  27
Commonwealth Grave No:  481028 – CWGC Website
Service number:  53089
Rank:  Corporal
Military Unit:  Canadian Forces

Military History

Henry went to Canada in 1913 and enlisted in Canada in 1914 at the outbreak of the war into the same regiment as his brother the 18th battalion Canadian Infantry (Western Ontario Regiment) Two days prior to Armistice day Henry was gassed and was taken to hospital where while being treated he developed influenza and pneumonia which caused his death.

Extra Information

He is buried in Belgarde Cemetery, Belgium He had a brother, Wilfred Arthur Cash who was a Lieutenant with the same 18th Battalion of the Canadian Infantry. Wilfred was two years the younger and was killed in action on October 1918
Arnold - Arnot Hill Park Memorial

Arnold – Arnot Hill Park Memorial

Church - St Paul's Church

Church – St Paul’s Church

Daybrook - St Paul's Church

Daybrook – St Paul’s Church

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2 thoughts on “Cash, Henry Wells: Service no. 53089

  1. Pingback: Brothers | War Diary of the 18th Battalion CEF

  2. This is a very interesting series. Thank you for taking the time and effort to document these young men’s stories. The Great War was probably the greatest waste of potential in the history of mankind. The truly tragic thing is in many cases entire towns, villages (and near the end cities) were emptied of young men. Many mothers lost ALL of their sons.

    Never again!

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