Faceless No More: Lieutenant Frederick Charles Garland Maund

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Lieutenant Frederick Charles Garland Maund. Source: 18th Battalion Facebook Group via member.

Lieutenant Frederick Charles Garland Maund was from Kingston and perished on the first day of the attack by the Canadian Expeditionary Force during its involvement at the Somme on September 15, 1916.

But for the work of like-minded people dedicated to bringing his memory to life, he would be all but forgotten.[i]

Lieutenant Maund was born and lived in Kingston, Ontario. He clerked for a company named K. & P. in Kingston and then moved to northern Ontario to Haileybury where he worked as an accountant. He then joined the 39th Battalion of the Canadian Expeditionary Force and then served actively with the 18th Battalion until his death on September 15, 1916.

Three news clippings bring details of his life to attention and from those details greater biographical information can be found to “flesh out” the man and make him more than a mere statistic. The news clippings, however brief, allow a bigger picture.

The company referred to as the K. & P.[ii] most likely referred to the Kingston and Pembroke Railway, locally known as the “Kick and Push Railroad” which served the area from its inception in 1871 until it was absorbed by the Canadian Pacific Railway in 1913.[iii] Perhaps Lieutenant Maund, as an accounting clerk, saw the declining economic viability of the railroad he worked for and moved before its absorption by the C.P.R. One news clipping indicates he moved north “some time ago” which hints that he left before the formal absorption of the line on January 1, 1913.[iv]

Address Card showing Next of Kin and Brothers address where he worked for a railway

Address Card showing Next of Kin and brother’s address at the Temiskaming Northern Railway Commision, Toronto, Ontario.

It is possible that he worked for another railway. In Lieutenant Maund’s service file[v] a card with information about next-of-kin, and other particulars of note, shows that his brother, W.H. Maund, worked for the Temiskaming & Northern [Ontario] Railway Commission and he was based out of Toronto, Ontario. This points to a connection between the reason Lieutenant Maund moved to northern Ontario and the possibility he worked for this organization having the advantage of the connection of his brother to enable this opportunity to come to him. W.H. Maund was the secretary treasurer of this organization, and would later have his services “dispensed” with by the findings of the 1935 Temiskaming and Northern Ontario Railway Inquiry[vi] by Armand Racine who scathingly criticized W.H. Maund’s role with this organisation[vii].

A possible motivation for Lieutenant Maund’s move was that the Temiskaming and Northern Ontario Railway was expanding since its inception in 1902 and the waning financial prospects for the K. & P. no longer held this young man back from a new opportunity. As noted in one of the news clippings, “…he was regarded as a most efficient and painstaking clerk.”[viii] Ontario’s north was expanding with increased investment in mineral and resource development offering opportunities for men of ability. These were the very economic engine the K. & P. had relied on, until these natural economic resources were depleted in its service area thereby decreasing its business resulting in its bankruptcy and financial hardship.

There is some confusion in the news clippings as to the location that Lieutenant Maund enlisted at. They state that he enlisted in “…with one of the battalions in the north country.”[ix] His service record[x] clearly shows that he enlisted at Belleville, Ontario on May 26, 1915 and is listed with the rank of Lieutenant on the 39th Battalion’s Nominal Roll[xi] published upon its embarkation to England on June 17, 1915. He is listed to having had previous military experience with the 47th Regiment.

In addition, he did not, as claimed in the news clippings, “transferred several times.” His service records clearly shows his enlistment with the 39th Battalion in Belleville, his subsequent service confirms he arrived with the battalion in England on June 17, 1915 and it appears that he was assigned to the Canadian Training Depot[xii] on February 19, 1916 where upon he proceeded to the 18th Battalion on June 17, 1916 and taken on strength with that battalion one day later. The 18th Battalion War Diary acknowledges his arrival with the Battalion, along Lieutenants Sykes[xiii], Mewburn[xiv], and Dunnett[xv] on June 20, 1916.

He served with the 18th uninterrupted until his death on September 15, 1916. His Circumstances of Death Card illuminates the setting of his passing, “During an advance South of Courcelette, he was killed by a high explosive shell as he led his men over the parapet.” His body may have been recovered but not clearly identified leading to his commemoration at the Vimy Memorial. This description of the incident may have come from one of the members of his platoon or company and the 18th Battalion War Diary is all but silent to terrible casualties of that month. Curiously, the September 22, 1916 news clipping from the Kingston Daily Standard states that his father did not know what battalion he served with and it further stated that Lieutenant Maund was fatally wounded in its follow up clipping on September 29, 1916. Perhaps in their grief they were too affected by their son’s death to relate this information.

This confusion would be normal as details of the casualties would be delayed due to the sheer volume of notices that would have been generated by the attack by the units involved in the September 15 attack during the Battle of Flers-Courcelette. The 18th Battalion on that day suffered 88 dead on that day[xvi]. The casualty reporting bureaucracy of the C.E.F. would have been inundated with casualty reports to process and forward, via telegraph, to Ottawa to be distributed to the next-of-kin notated in the service records. The sheer volume of this activity would bog any organization down. Of note is that the details of Lieutenant Maund’s death were not confirmed by the Battalion to General Headquarters until September 18, 1916.

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Graves Registration Report Form showing the four 18th Battalion officers commemorated with memorial crosses at the Courcelette British Cemetery.

It is interesting to note that the Commonwealth War Graves Commission[xvii] notes that Lieutenant Maund, along with his brother officers of the 18th, Lieutenants R.B. Barnes[xviii], J.C. Mewburn, and W.H. Willard[xix] are further commemorated at the Courcelette British Cemetery. There lie 1,969 dead, of whom only 790 are identified, giving some indication of the horrible maw the Somme battle was for the Imperial forces engaged there. There is a notation on the document that these officers are “BELIEVED TO BE BURIED IN THIS CEMETRY” and that they are recognized with memorial crosses.

Up until last week we had no idea who Lieutenant Frederick Charles Garland Maund was. We now know he lived in Kingston, had a brother and was an accounting clerk working for the Kingston and Pembroke Railway and possibly through the auspicious influence of his brother, the Temiskaming and Northern Ontario Railway. The news clippings relate information that can be refuted and clarified, and we now have a better understanding of his life than we had prior to these news clippings being discovered and recorded.

He lost his life with his brother officers in a terrible conflict. He was faceless up until today.

He is not now.

He is remembered.

[i] Special thanks to Iris Russak and Peter Gower for submitting the news clippings, there by making this article possible.

[ii] Daily British Whig. September 22, 1916. Submitted by Iris Russak via Peter Gower.

[iii] “Kingston and Pembroke Railway.” Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, 13 June 2018, en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kingston_and_Pembroke_Railway.

[iv] The Kick and Push Railway. (2018). The Kingston and Pembroke Railway. [online] Available at: https://kickandpushca.wordpress.com/history-2/the-kingston-and-pembroke-railway/ [Accessed 1 Oct. 2018].

[v] Service Record: MAUND, FREDERICK CHARLES LT. (2018). [ebook] Ottawa, Ontario, Canada: Library and Archives Canada, pp.1-44. Available at: http://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/discover/military-heritage/first-world-war/personnel-records/Pages/item.aspx?IdNumber=199662 [Accessed 1 Oct. 2018].

[vi] Racine, A. (1935). Temiskaming and Northern Ontario Railway Inquiry. [online] Ontla.on.ca. Available at: http://www.ontla.on.ca/library/repository/mon/25005/15316.pdf [Accessed 1 Oct. 2018].

[vii] An example from the report states: “Foremost in this internal ring of those entitled to be criticized is Mr. Maund. Every activity within the railway was subject to his direction and consultation with other members of the circle. At no time during this investigation did Mr. Maund display that he had any of the qualifications necessary either for the position of secretary or treasurer. He steadily refused to accept responsibility for any of the acts which he had done and attempted to place the blame upon the Chairman. The secretarial duties he performed could be competently taken care of by a stenographer, and in matters financial he showed a deplorable lack of appreciation of the responsibility his position involved.” Racine, A. (1935). Temiskaming and Northern Ontario Railway Inquiry. [online] Ontla.on.ca. Available at: http://www.ontla.on.ca/library/repository/mon/25005/15316.pdf [Accessed 1 Oct. 2018]. Pg. 17.

[viii] Daily British Whig. September 22, 1916. Submitted by Iris Russak via Peter Gower.

[ix] Kingston Daily Standard. September 22, 1916. Submitted by Iris Russak via Peter Gower.

[x] Service Record: MAUND, FREDERICK CHARLES LT. (2018). [ebook] Ottawa, Ontario, Canada: Library and Archives Canada, pp.1-44. Available at: http://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/discover/military-heritage/first-world-war/personnel-records/Pages/item.aspx?IdNumber=199662 [Accessed 1 Oct. 2018].

[xi] Canadian Expeditionary Force 39th Battalion Nominal Roll of Officers, Non-Commissioned Officers and Men. (1915). [ebook] Ottawa, Ontario, Canada: Government of Canada, p.1. Available at: https://archive.org/details/CEF_39thBattalion_1915/page/n1 [Accessed 1 Oct. 2018].

[xii] The legibility of this entry in his service record is poor.

[xiii] Sykes, Hugh Harding: Lieutenant (Military Cross).

[xiv] Mewburn, John Chilton:  Lieutenant.

[xv] Dunnett, Harry Douglas: Lieutenant.

[xvi] Spreadsheet September1916.xlsx compile by author.

[xvii] Commonwealth War Graves Commission (2018). Graves Registration Report Form: Courcelette British Cemetery. [image] Available at: https://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/1571739/maund,-frederick-charles-garland/#&gid=null&pid=1 [Accessed 1 Oct. 2018].

[xviii] Barnes, Reginald Brooke:  Lieutenant.

[xix] Willard, William Hartley: Lieutenant.

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